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ancient Eastern concept of yin and
yang as it relates to the human
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acupuncture, Acupuncture is based
on the ancient Eastern concept of
yin and yang as it relates to the
human body. Indio acupuncturist,
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Joshua Tree acupuncture, Acupuncture is based on the ancient Eastern concept of yin and yang as it relates to the human body. Yucca Valley acupuncture, Acupuncture is based on the ancient
Eastern concept of yin and yang as it relates to the human body. Banning acupuncture, Acupuncture is based on the ancient Eastern concept of yin and yang as it relates to the human body.  
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body. Morongo Valley acupuncture.
The Shanghai Hospital of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine serves a district of
Shanghai with over 3 Million people. Consequently, the daily frequency of patient visits is
quite high. Each acupuncture doctor treats about 100 patients a day, and there were
about 6 acupuncture doctors in the department where I stayed, not counting the other
departments in the hospital. But it is organized in a way that it doesn’t appear rushed or
stressful. The doctors have a lot of help as nurses and interns take care of the patients
before and during the treatment. The doctor only inserts the needles and gives injections
into the acupuncture points – yes injections. The injections that are given are mostly
saline solution, and there is no pharmacological action. It was done to give additional
stimulation to the points and produce – as I was told - better results in pain management.
This is out of our scope of practice as acupuncturist in California; some other states like
New Mexico and Florida allow it.

The treatment area is not a private room, like the patients are used to here. It was a big
room with about 10 tables on each opposing wall that had curtains for privacy around
them, like here in the emergency room. In the middle of the room, where two rows of  
about 5 armchairs, where people could get treated who did not need to lay down for the
treatment, like for knee pain, shoulder pain, or other conditions.

Once a new patient arrived, the doctor would examine him or her and determines the
point prescription and a frequency of treatment. Let’s say for example, the patient needed
to come in for treatment 3 times a week for 4 weeks. From then on the patient would
come in, find the designated treatment area, was given acupuncture by the doctor, and
the intern (medical student) would administer moxibustion treatment or electro
stimulation to the points the doctor had prescribed. After about 30 minutes, the intern
would take the needles out and tell the doctor that the patient was ready for the
injections. Now the doctor would approach the patient with a regular syringe and inject
saline solution into specific acupuncture points.

Acupuncture as a modality requires a certain frequency. It is normal for Chinese people to
go in for acupuncture three times a week, or in some cases daily. This is difficult to
understand by patients in America. People have too many commitments, and getting to
the acupuncturist once a week is sometimes difficult. Usually we can’t cure a problem in
only one treatment; I wish we could.

I saw many patients in Shanghai—some of whom even got to know me and bring me
small gifts. Making new friends, learning new techniques and observing how doctors of
Chinese medicine work in the homeland was exiting. In my leisure time, I was touring
Shanghai museums, including the Museum of Chinese Medicine, discovering restaurants,
and touring the World Exposition that happened to be exhibiting during my visit. Coming
home with a bag filled with new inspiration made this trip worthwhile.

China Experience
Treating patients in Shanghai
in Palm Springs, California
Monday morning I was presented to the head doctor of the department at the Shanghai  
TCM-Integrated Hospital, who then introduced me to the doctors of the department
where I was to see patients with the aid of translators. I met Dr. Hu, and two female
doctors Dr. Huang, and Dr. Tong. The word “Tong” has several meanings in Chinese,
depending on its intonation, one of them is “pain,” but I was assured by my translator
Bruce, a medical student, who spoke excellent English, that in this case it meant “child.”
However Dr. Pain could be a very good name for an acupuncture doctor, thinking of "pain
relief".
For  an  acupuncturist trained in the west,
going to China is something like an initiation
or baptism. I finally fulfilled that dream and
enrolled in a practicum at the Shanghai
Traditional Chinese Medicine Clinic for
Integrated Medicine. Here in the West,
Oriental Medicine is something foreign that
cannot be explained by what we know from
our Western Medicine point of view, and it is
not rooted in our medical traditions.
Subsequently, how oriental medicine works
appears strange to our patients, the MDs or
insurance companies, and often we find our
methods being questioned. We spent a lot of
time doing much explaining. Urban myths
about acupuncture and herbs are being
created, and  patients are not always open
to our point of view.
However, in China, naturally Chinese
medicine—acupuncture, herbs,
cupping, moxibustion and other
techniques—are primary medicine, not
alternative. I immediately noticed that
patients expect to be treated with
acupuncture, and there is no mistrust
or skepticism about it. It was liberating
to be in the birthplace of Chinese
Medicine, where my modality is
mainstream and well accepted. It was
very healing and empowering for me
as a practitioner to feel supported in
this way.


The way an acupuncture clinic is
organized in a typical Chinese Hospital
is much different from the setup that
most patients are accustomed to in the
US.